Sir Alfred Jules Ayer

Sir Alfred Jules Ayer

Born: 1910. Died: 1989

Alfred Jules Ayer was lecturer and research fellow at Oxford's Christ Church College from 1933 to 1944.

Then he was fellow (1944-1945) and dean (1945-1946) of Wadham College.

From 1946 to 1959 Ayer was Grote professor of the philosophy of mind and logic at the University of London, and in 1959 he became Wykeham professor of logic at Oxford.

His best-known publication, Language, Truth and Logic (1936), was the leading British statement of logical positivism. His ideas were seen as a radical departure from established philosophy.

He was also popularly known after the war as a participant on the radio discussion programme, the Brains Trust.

Major Books of Sir Alfred Jules Ayer

- Bertrand Russell, 1972
- The Central Questions of Philosophy, 1973
- The Concept of a Person, 1963
- The Conception of Probability as a Logical Relation, in S. Korner, editor, Observation and Interpretation in the Philosophy of Physics, 1957
- The Foundations of Empirical Knowledge, 1940
- Freedom and Morality and Other Essays, 1984
- Hume, 1980
- Language, Truth, and Logic, 1936
- Ludwig Wittgenstein, 1986
- Metaphysics and Common Sense, 1969
- More of My Life, 1984
- The Origins of Pragmatism, 1968
- Part of My Life, 1977
- Philosophical Essays, 1954
- Philosophy in the Twentieth Century, 1982
- Probability and Evidence, 1972
- The Problem of Knowledge, 1956
- Replies, in G. Macdonald, editor, Perception and Identity: Essays Presented to A. J. Ayer, With His Replies, 1979
- Russell and Moore: The Analytical Heritage, 1971
- Thomas Paine, 1988

Major Articles of Sir Alfred Jules Ayer

- 1934, Demonstration of the Impossibility of Metaphysics, Mind
- 1934, The Genesis of Metaphysics, Analysis
- 1935, The Criterion of Truth, Analysis
- 1936, The Principle of Verifiability, Mind
- 1936, Verification and Experience, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society
- 1937, Atomic Propositions, Analysis
- 1945, The Terminology of Sense-Data, Mind
- 1946-1947, Phenomenalism, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society
- 1948, Philosophy without Science, with Viscount Samuel and Herbert Dingle, Philosophy
- 1952, Individuals, Mind
- 1952, Negation, J. Philosophy
- 1953, "Cogito, Ergo Sum", Analysis
- 1967, Has Austin Refuted the Sense-Data Theory?, Synthese
- 1977, The Causal Theory of Perception, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society

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